Image: Holly and her pups having a stroll

Finding your dream job on the other side of the world can be a daunting task. Finding a job in the city you live in can be hard enough, throw a tonne of cultural differences and a different hemisphere into the mix and it can seem nearly impossible to get to where you want to go.

So, how did I find this amazing place to work that inspires me to wake up every morning? Well, part luck and part creative research.

My job search for a role in the software and technology industry wasn’t carried out in the way you might typically expect. A lot of people surf job boards and click on anything that sounds remotely interesting. From there, they might pull up a company’s website and then make a call about whether to apply or not. You know, the standard process that I had done in the past. Except this time around I never used a job board. Crazy, right?

The thing is, I wasn’t looking for just another job. In fact, I was moving to the opposite side of the world (literally) from Seattle, Washington to Sydney, Australia, where I was going to set up a new home. I have provided the below photo comparison for your viewing pleasure.


From here:

Image Source: Pixabay.com


To here:

Image Source: Pixabay.com


With such a massive life change underway, why would I settle for just another job? I knew that I had a solid background of experience and would be a strong candidate for the right role. More than that, I knew that my priorities had changed since the last time I was looking for a job.

I needed to find a place where work culture was the first priority over anything else. After all, I could do the same job anywhere, so why not do so in a worthwhile place to work?

So, how did I approach my job search this time around? Sort of backwards, actually. 
I updated my LinkedIn profile and made sure I had some references on there. Then I started my hunt by running a Google search for ‘best companies to work for in Australia.’ No joke.

I also pulled up Forbes’ list of best companies to work for worldwide, along with a few other lists of most highly rated companies to work for to see if I could find any other results.

I collated all of my findings in a spreadsheet listing the companies that looked most interesting, bearing in mind that the most important thing I was looking for were companies that ranked highly for great culture and work environment. Any other unique perks couldn’t hurt either, so I made sure to colour code my spreadsheet to take any of these factors into account as well. I knew that I wanted to stay in the software and technology industry, so that fact also helped refine my search.


Then I began my search.


With my Excel spreadsheet available for tracking, I began by going to Glassdoor to see how each company was rated by their employees. If a company was given a rating of under 3.5, they were removed from the spreadsheet. Simple as that.

As ridiculous as it may sound to some, culture was my number one priority. I had worked for some really large and successful companies in the U.S., but had found myself rather stressed out and miserable working there due to the lack of focus on ensuring a healthy and engaging culture for employees at these places. With this in mind, I read through all of the reviews of potential companies that I could find and sorted down my list even further.


At this point, I checked out company websites and LinkedIn pages.


I was not only looking for information on each company itself, but was also trying to get a feel for the company through their website design. If the website was vibrant and engaging, it was a good indication that the company would be too. More specifically than that, I was looking for visual indicators – photos of the office space, the employees and any company events. Or even better, videos!

I cannot stress enough how awesome videos are on a company employment page for prospective employees. There is no better way to get a feel for a company and its people than by watching some
videos.

With my finalised list, I pursued all of the open jobs at my top options. If a company didn’t have any open jobs available, I simply moved them to the bottom of the list for later.

Funnily enough, JobAdder didn’t have any openings when I first checked out their website so they were moved to the bottom of the list with the hope that they might have an opening later on. I had watched all of their videos, read all about the team and even dreamed about the life I might have working there.


Just kidding.


Or am I?


In any case, after I started the interview process with a few different companies, I eventually came back to the bottom of my list and decided to check their job pages again. This time around, JobAdder had an opening that was perfect for me!

From the first time I watched their videos, I knew that I would fit in. The fact that they had a beer fridge may have tickled my fancy a bit too. So naturally I applied.

As soon as I sat down in the JobAdder office for my first interview, I knew I didn’t want to leave. Now they are stuck with me whether they like it or not, and literally could not pay me to leave. And to think that I found such a perfect place for me from all the way on the other side of the world, in the most unusual of ways.

It just goes to show that with a little luck, and knowing the right ways to go about it, you really can find your dream job no matter where you are in the world!


2 Comments

  1. Love this article and the picture it paints. What an example of working smarter, not harder to achieve your dream job! With this creative approach and your winning style and tenacious attitude, your new work family must know, they hit the lottery with you as a hire!

  2. I find this job search you did interesting. It was so organized and it helped you to achieve your objective. If I were younger I would be in Australia. Love your blog.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Close